Why I Have Given Up on Coding Standards

Every developer knows you should have a one, exact, coding standard in your company. Every developer also knows you have to fight to get your rules into the company standard. Every developer secretly despairs when starting a new job, afraid of the crazy coding standard some power-mad architect has dictated.

It’s better to throw coding standards out and allow free expression. The small win you get from increased conformity does not move the needle. Coding standards are technical ass-covering. At nearForm I don’t want one, because I want everyone to think for themselves.

There’s a lot of noise out there. The resurrection of JavaScript is responsible. One “feature” in particular: optional semi-colons. Terabytes of assertion, conjecture and counter-argument are clogging up the intertubes. Please go write some code instead. You know who you are.

Well-meaning, and otherwise fabulous developers are publishing JavaScript coding standards and style guides. You are all wrong. Stop trying to save the world.

Here’s what’s happening: when you started coding you had no idea what you were doing. It was all fun and games until you lost an eye. Once you hurt yourself one too many times with sloppy code, you came to understand that you were a mere apprentice. Starting on the path to master craftsman, you soaked up Code Complete, The Pragmatic Programmer, and of course, Joel.

And then, it happened. On the road to Damascus you gained insight. Your new grab bag of tricks would make you a rock star programmer. Your productivity had already doubled (looking back, that’s hardly surprising). And now you needed to spread the word. What worked for you will save others. You cajoled, you preached, you pestered. You lectured your boss on the need for best practices and standards. And most unforgivable of all, you blogged.

Most developers don’t make noise. Those who make noise, get promoted. You got promoted. You imposed your brilliant ideas on others, certain of victory. You wrote a coding standards document, and you made it law.

And then, nothing. The same old slog, the same death marches, the same bugs, the same misery. No silver bullet.

After a few years, you stopped coding and became a manager. You still know that coding standards, rules and regulations are vital. All it requires is proper implementation. You’ve never quite got there, but you’ll keep trying. Hit ’em over the head a bit more. Code metrics! In any case, as a manager you get to delegate the pain away.

There is another road. Perhaps you went back to coding, or never left. Over time you came to realize that you know so little, and all your wonderful ideas are sand castles. You’re washed up. This is the next level of insight.

Other people are smarter than you. Not some of them. All of them. The coder writing the user interface? They are smarter than you … about the user interface. You’re not writing the code. Why don’t you trust them? No, that’s not the right question. They will still mess up. Why are you making a bigger mess by telling them what to do?

You get to the point where you understand that people are not machines. You need to push intelligence out to the edges. You need to give up control to get the best results.

So why do most intelligent coders do exactly the opposite? What makes us such ready dictators?

First, you transfer your own experiences onto others. But not everybody thinks like you. Brains are pretty weird.

Second, control feels good. It’s a comfortable hole in the sand. But you can’t tell coders what to do. Cats don’t herd.

Third, you get to duck responsibility. Everybody on the team does. We followed the rules! You failed. Yes, but we followed the rules! Well in that case, here’s another project…

Fourth, good intentions; best practices; professionalism; engineering – the seductions of process. You are chasing the same gold stars you got when you were eight years old. But how is the master craftsman judged? By results, only.

Fifth, idealism, the belief that you can understand the world and bend it to your will. Something we’re pretty good at as a species … after we fail a thousand times, and with repeatable processes. Software projects are always one of a kind.

There are worse sins than these. You only need one of them to end up with a coding standard.

The truly evil thing about coding standards is what they do to your heart, your team’s heart. They are a little message that you are not good enough. You cannot quite be trusted. Without adult supervision, you’ll mess up.

We started nearForm about a year ago, and one thing we really care about is writing great code for our clients. In earlier lives, I’ve tried all the processes and methods and rules of thumb. They all suck. None of them deliver.

Starting with the principle that our coders are really smart. That does work.

I expect everyone to write good clean code. You decide what that means. You decide if you can sleep at night with random code layouts and inconsistent variable names. But you know what, maybe they just don’t matter for a 100 line node.js mini-server that only does one thing. You decide.

It is your responsibility, because you can code.




This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

305 Responses to Why I Have Given Up on Coding Standards

  1. Pingback: Orestes | Why I Have Given Up on Coding Standards

  2. Pingback: » Why I Have Given Up on Coding Standards Andy Rumpler

  3. Pingback: Why I Have Given Up on Coding Standards | My Daily Feeds

  4. Pingback: Some light dinner reading | Tyler Merrick

  5. Pingback: JavaScript Semi-Colons | Diputs Media

  6. Pingback: Why I Have Given Up on Coding Standards | My Daily Feeds

  7. Pingback: Coding standards

  8. Pingback: Coding Standars – As a software craftsman, yes I care | The Ordinary Developer

  9. Pingback: Coding Standards: Consistency is King - Tom Lee

  10. Pingback: Stuff The Internet Says On Scalability For November 30, 2012 | Krantenkoppen Tech

  11. Pingback: LATW Episode 20 (October 1–November 30, 2012) « shahriar

  12. Pingback: Richard Rodger: Warum ich auf Coding Standards haben | PHP Boutique

  13. Pingback: Coding standards are communication tools | The ByteBaker

  14. Pingback: What is a coding style standard? Do style standards really help? Why can't programmers all just use their default style? » No Sleep Til Bootcamp!

  15. Pingback: Top 10 Very Very VERY Important Topics to Discuss | Java, SQL and jOOQ.

  16. Pingback: 10 things developers need to shut up about - JAXenter

  17. Pingback: Why I Have Given Up on Coding Standards | Richard Rodger - IT Humor

  18. Pingback: Readability

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.